NEWS & INSIGHT

  • 12.12.2017
    As of January 2016, it is estimated that there are 15.5 million cancer survivors in the United States, representing 4.8% of the population. Everyone has a unique experience with life after cancer treatment. While some are able to resume their lives with minimal changes, many people have some residual effects — either emotional, physical or both. There is no one “normal” after cancer treatment — ...
  • 11.30.2017
    The holiday season is upon us and that means the gift-buying season has also arrived. Choosing gifts for friends and family can be a challenge — Will it fit? Will they use it? Will they like it? Those challenges can be magnified when buying a gift for someone undergoing cancer treatment. We researched gift ideas from a number of cancer support websites, including ihadcancer.com, and came up with...
  • man meditating
    11.27.2017
    Many cancer patients have someone in their life who is a vital part of their care team, but is not a paid medical professional. This caregiver is often a spouse, child, other relative or a close friend. If you’re caregiver to a patient, cancer or otherwise, you’re playing an essential role in another’s healthcare treatment and daily life. What is a caregiver? Though you may consider yourself a...
  • Breast self exam
    10.12.2017
      In terms of breast cancer diagnosis (or any cancer, really), there is a common refrain: The earlier, the better. In the context of cancer, this trite saying can be applied to when the cancer is diagnosed, or “caught.” If you catch a tumor at an earlier stage, your chances of recovery and a return to a high quality of life are far greater.   Because early diagnosis is so important, it’s vital to...
  • John McCain
    10.12.2017
      In July of this year, Senator John McCain announced to the nation that he had brain cancer — specifically, glioblastoma.    The tumor was discovered when the 80-year old Arizona senator went in for a routine physical exam and a blood clot was discovered above his left eye. During the procedure to remove the blood clot, tissue pathology revealed that a glioblastoma was associated with the clot....
  • 10.05.2017
    In early 2017, Sandy Sepsey of Fallon, Nevada had an uneasy feeling—as if a pill was stuck in her throat. She went to her general practitioner to investigate. While initial blood tests came back normal, Sandy knew something wasn’t right and asked for a chest x-ray. It revealed a mass in her right lung, prompting a biopsy that confirmed her suspicion. In March, she was diagnosed with non-operable...
  • 10.02.2017
    Madelyn Stikes, a retired English and special education teacher, has been training to beat cancer practically her whole life. She just didn’t know it. “I figured out how to help middle schoolers with learning challenges not to give up,” she said. “I believe in doing the best you can with what you have, and I taught that to my students.”    Fast forward to 2003. “I had just moved to the area when...
  • breakthroughs in ovarian cancer research
    09.26.2017
      At any given moment in time, thousands of scientists in every corner of the world are working on research to find a cure or a better treatment for some form of cancer. In just the past few months, we’ve seen numerous breakthroughs in ovarian cancer treatment. Below is an overview of three of the most promising research projects. While still in the pre-clinical stage, prior to human trial, these...
  • cancer book list
    09.19.2017
      Catching up on your reading is likely not at the top of your list when faced with a cancer diagnosis. However, the right read can provided helpful information, timely comfort, inspiration or the healing power of a good laugh. Here are 10 books that offer 10 unique approaches to facing cancer head on.   1. Because laughter is good medicine: Cancer Vixen by Marisa Acocella Marchetto “What happens...
  • melanoma treatment
    09.14.2017
      Every individual’s reaction to getting a cancer diagnosis is unique. When Constantine Kuzmicki of Wellington, Nevada got his, he reacted in a very no-nonsense manner. “Okay, so I have a melanoma,” he thought. “Either I die of cancer or we do something about it. It’s no big deal.” Perhaps Constantine’s relaxed attitude comes from the fact that he’s had to handle more than his fair share of...

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